Squirrel Creek Wildlife Rescue © 2013  |  Privacy Policy

Specializing in the rescue and rehabilitation of orphaned and injured wildlife  in Colorado.

(303) 791-0500

A little about Squirrel Creek.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our facility is located at Squirrel Creek Lodge, a commercial lodge in northwest Douglas County. Wildlife rehabilitation activities are always closed to the public because wildlife needs to be left alone in order to recover, grow, and remain afraid of humans.  There is also the possibility of disease transmission between wildlife and humans.

 

Visit www.squirrelcreek.com  for more info about the lodge itself.

 

For wildlife emergencies, you will have to use your best judgement. Never call the local Division of Colorado Parks & Wildlife.  This will result in death for the animal. They are a "KILL ONLY" agancy.

 

BE WARNED: Most "wildlife rehabilitation centers" will push you for a donation and kill the animal as soon as you are out the door. No other center will take a animal that requires over-night care. There are a handful of brilliant individuals that can care for wildlife in the state......but only a few.

 

After hours & holidays if we are not available you can contact your local state patrol and they will contact the Game Officer on duty and they will shoot the animal. If you do not want the animal shot, do not cal them.

 

We advise you NOT to pick up the creature - you can get sick if it is sick, you can be poisoned if it has been, just by inhaling its breath, or absorbing the poison thru your skin.  You may injure the creature further by handling.  Some diseases transmitted from wildlife to humans (zoonoses) are deadly to humans, such as roundworms!  In Colorado, it is against the law to have wildlife in your possession unless you have a permit for it.

 

Also, you must give wildlife a chance, by allowing the parent the opportunity to come back to its young.  Deer and Elk hide their young during the day while they graze in the morning and again in the evening.  They all bed down during the heat of the day.  They do not lay with their young.  Raptors (owls/hawks/eagles) often gorge feed - meaning they have eaten so much off a carcass they cannot take off.  They remain on the ground for many hours until they digest their food.

 

Some indicators that something may be wrong is; skunks, raccoons out in broad daylight, especially on a hot day.  You have watched a fawn/elk calve for 24 hours and are positive it hasn’t moved.  Raccoon babies crying.  A beaver or other creature circling in the road.

 

Rehabilitation animals can spend anywhere from a few days to several months at Squirrel Creek before release. It all depends on the species, how old they were when they arrived, and the nature of their injuries.

 

Squirrel Creek Wildlife Rescue is the largest rescue of Colorado's wildlife in the state. Please be sure to help us, help the wildlife if you can.

 

Thank you!

 

Kendall Seifert ~ Director

Squirrel Creek Wildlife Rescue